Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CSPAN2 16
CNNW 14
CSPAN 10
MSNBCW 9
FBC 3
KCSM (PBS) 3
KNTV (NBC) 3
KGO (ABC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
CNBC 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 86
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
do. >> last month, epa administrator gina mccarthy testified before the house science committee on the agencies will science and technology activities. the committee examine the policy of transparency practices on clean air and water acts and hydraulic fracturing or cracking. we bring you that kerry now. i'm not [inaudible conversations] >> to commit inside space and technology will come to order. welcome, everyone to today's hearing entitled strengthening transparency and accountability within the environmental protection agency. we're going to recognize myself or fitness for a doping statement and then i'll recognize the ranking member for hers. the environmental protection agency like every other governmental institution should answer to the american people. everyone agrees we need to protect the environment, but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet epa's justification for regulation are cloaked in secrecy i asked. it appears the epa been a lot of stretches of science to justify its own object disappeared am
that we understand how to answer those issues effective from a science perspective, and in a way that continues to maintain the availability of inexpensive natural gas that strengths the economy as well as help us reduce air emission. >> i appreciate that. i think it seems like a reasonable response. someone who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because
science in the world. we want to understand how life works at the detailed levels and apply that in terms of coming up with new insights to prevent and treat disease. >> we support tens of thousands of grants across the country conducted by the world's most cutting-edge scientist in the united states who are working on cancer, aids and other drugs. we are on a roll but there is a bit of an issue with the cuts. >> let's learn about the history. your roots date back to the late 1700s. but you were formed in 1887 as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? >> the current budget is about $29 billion. the number of people that work on the campus is about 17,000. most of the work is done by grants we give to the institutions across the country and globally. 85% is spent there in the universities where you are hearing about medical breakthroughs. >> how long have you been with nih? >> i came here 20 years ago, steve. asked to come lead the human genome project. in 2003, they laid out all three letters of the dna instruction book w
research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the human genome project. p
never do that. you don't destroy the science to get to the headline. >> you don't distort the science to get to the headline. it you want to follow more of that issue, i recommend an amicus brief. i was involved in with it with the professor in which we recruited a number of distinguished scientists. we could have used more. and attempted so simply explain what the relevant issues on court junk dna were. but the court used it in the opinion nonetheless. it's an interesting brief, and easily obtained so the idea of the scientific safe guards then was those being used were not revealing much more than identity. it was sort of the basic end of the brief as well. privacy laden use of dna. statutes can be changed. supreme court clearly rejected the view in king by saying that once the statutes are in place, we will give a presumption they are followed. what is left after king? one issue is the balancing work the same in cases that are not, quote, seriouses offense. at least four times in the king opinion you see the phrase serious offense never defined. is it descriptive? if it's vital to
labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a histori
the science of space and technology committee in the house criticized roles the epa said on the amount of carbon pollution new power plants were allowed to remain. this is the epa is way too slow or reverse the effects of climate change. a letter addressed to the head of the agency. lamar smith wrote the agency is a stubborn insistence on placing its judgment of biomass of that science advisers raises serious concerns that the apa is a roll making is based more on partisan politics and sound science but on wednesday a job for the stars with a two hour long hearing called astral biology the search for bio signatures in our solar system and the lines. this guy saying that is possibly just about life on other planets aren't possibility of june more than you the pope refused. what can we find hope and pray the atmosphere to the french who drive by of signatures that would indicate the presence of some form of gluten free life. what would be the implications of such a discovery. pics are now questioning the lamar smith concedes aliens as sound science but quiet change and partisan politics
and i in love not only with the concept of discovery and science that has to do with health but the extraordinary electricity of atmosphere here at the nih. new york for a year to complete the training as a en came back here senior scientist and have been here ever since. place.n extraordinary and diversity and interaction and communication is sometimes jokewe around but it isn't a joke. i would do it for nothing if i opportunity. it's such an exciting experience. appreciate the chance to talk to you and other experts on show our audience going there. this past week president talking aids aids as part of world day and another $1 million in aids resoeufplt here's what the had to saeufplt i want your reaction afterwards. announcedd aids day i drug llion for the aids assistance program which help people pay for life saving medications. was so ime the need great that over 9,000 people were on the wait list. vowed to get those numbers down. as of last week we have cleared the wait list. to zero and we'll it back.ing to get [applause] so we're making progress. we we're all here to
courage and enormous strength, as well as, he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, to understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. he walked through his climate action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the epa and other agencies across the administration are now taking to cut carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor relations regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. this would ensure any ne
. >> joining me from cambridge, massachusetts, a professor of planet tear science at m.i.t. and just this wednesday she testified before congress. it is great to speak with yo you{^l" ^}. for those who haven't had the benefit of watching your tech talk, will you tell me about your work, and everyone is watching about your work in planetary exploration. >> sure, tony, it's great to be here. to summarize it in a nutshell we want to know if there are other planets like earth out there. ranging from computer programming, and hubble telescope to planning separati e exploration. >> is there an earth twin out there? >> we don't have enough evidence to say anywhere near for sure there is an earth twin. but our data so far shows that small planets are common. they are everywhere we look. we do find small planets. >> what are bio signatures? and what do they tell us? >> well, bio signature gasses haven't yet been found on another planet beyond earth but they are gasses in an atmosphere that are produced by life. oxygen, what we need to survive, is here in huge quantities. without life on earth
. >> passengers advised to get a tb shot. >> and a math and science and broethalizer and high school's controversy. >> and someone offers you alcohol. i might be alcohol tested and that eases the peer pressure off of you. y building a play set begins with a surprisewinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ >>> at the moment, a nationwide man hunt for a handyman colorado. police accuse him of shooting and killing three family members and setting their home on fire. the suspect, 59-year-old marry maps described as 6 feet tall, 135 pounds, red hair, blue eyes, said to live with the family up until a week before the incident. authorities say they consider maps to be armed and dangerous. southern colorado. >>> a scary situation for passengers aboard a us airways flight from austin, texas, to phoenix, after they were reportedly told that they may have been exposed to tuberculosis. word is emergency personnel cameonboard and announced that a passenger on board was carrying the disease. the centers for disease contro
parents did, to pursue careers in medicine, science, education. many are proud business owners of law firms, restaurants, grocery stores, shipping companies and hair braiding venues. there are those who have come as asylum seekers, feeling war, famine and again side. they come to the united states to become productive tax paying members of our society. and like the other immigrant groups, immigrants are dealing with the back logged immigration processing, families being ripped apart, falling out of status because they were eeked out. racial and status discrimination, felony laws that prohibit judicial review, deportation processes that violate human rights and prohibitive student visa programs limited access to work permits and much, much more. mr. speaker, it is imperative for us to acknowledge the fact that many immigrants arrive on our shores during a time in their lives when they are most productive. the most productive years in their lives. bringing them to the floor would deny us as a nation the opportunity to access their talent, their skill and abilities in the prime of their
. men or women's brains. what about handling stress? which gend accident occur that better? the science -- which gender does that better? the science is in so stay tuned for that. ♪ ♪ i ied depend last weekend. ♪ it really made the difference between a morning around the house and getting a little exercise. unlike the bargain brand, depend gives you new fit-flex®, our best protection. it's a smooth and comfortable fit with more lycra strands. get your free sample at depend.com. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen tthem. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> good morning. it's friday, december 6. i'm elisabeth hasselbeck. this morning the world's mourning the loss of an icon. reaction to the passing of nelson mandela live from south africa. >>> and we now know the president's promise. you can keep your health care if you like it. it wasn't exactly true. we thought it was plowed ground. the
the simulation center, which is opening in january. >> sure. the simulation center is part of our health sciences complex where you look at where medicine is going. we are trying to really force all of the education around medicine to be patient centric and make everyone realize you need a team approach. that also involves looking at using technology, to teach people how to do things. the way i was trained where i had to do one and then observe one, do one and teach one. we now have simulation for everything. unbelievable in terms of the technology. whoa have a mannequin who will deliver baby, et cetera. so it's extremely high tech. and that summation center, in my opinion, would be best in the midatlantic area when we open it in january. >> that sounds fascinating. >> absolutely. >> a mannequin delivering a baby? >> that's absolutely right. >> physical plant, new dorms, new buildings going up. >> that's right. two new residence halls are going up. atmosphere on the campus and keep as many of our students on the campus. it helps with student life. that's going on. i think again it will be a state
. >> absolutely. absolutely. the science shows that the way we change behavior is by working together in groups. that's what the science shows, for all sorts of conditions, diabetes and so forth. so the daniel plan, we had 12,000 people lose a quarter of a million pounds in a year and they did it together. those who did it together lost twice as much weight as those who did it alone and got twice as healthy. it wasn't a weight loss program. it was about the science of creating health. the weight loss was a side effect. they supported each other, they helped each other, they cooked together, they shopped together, they exercised together. they were there when they had issues and troubles and struggles to support each other and get back on track. that's the power of community. the community was the medicine. >> i know you want people to get the book, but how does this relate to daniel from the bible? >> well, daniel was a young jewish leader who, during the captivity of the jewish nation taken to babylon, he was being tutored by the babylonian king and one of the perks of being in the king's hous
laughs. we'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace
one episode. he will quiz me. also we will talk about the science of men and women. we are wired differently. we will talk about the wires. new jersey mayor a war on christmas. he's going to do it for people on 22 stories without a rope this year. he will have knee pads on anna rope. also today featured on our camera ian playing the role of ilan. scott on camera 2. take a look at scott. there's scott. no there is scott. and joe the floor manager. how much time do we have left in this promo. that's it. there's joe. quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "fumbling around with rotating categories" card. it's not the etting blindsided by limits" card. it's the no-game-playing, no-earning-limit-having, deep-bomb-throwing, give-me-the-ball-and-i'll-take- it-to-the-house, cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every single day. soet me ask you... at's in your wallet? more shopping. more dining out. more traveling. and along with it, more identity theft. every time you pull out your cr
and stuff. >> kate larson, nbc bay area news. >> and coming up next, creating science projects out of scrap. we'll show you. >> it's so cool. and so weird and whacky and different. that looking at them just, you know, gets you excited. wow, what is that thing? >> i like weird, whacky and different. how a bay area teacher developed a nonprofit that helps thousands of classrooms. i love watching tv outside. and why can you move the tv out here? the wireless receiver. i got that when i switched to u-verse. but why? because it's so much better than cable. it's got more hd channels, more dvr space. yeah, but i mean, how did you know? i researched. no, i-i told you. no. yeah! no. the important part is that you're happy now. and i got you this visor. you made a visor! yes! that i'll never wear. ohh. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for two years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. ♪ pose! yeah! ♪ flash! yeah! ♪ get the family to strike a pose, ♪ ♪ and show off your brand new clothes! ♪ ♪ that's my kind of holiday. >> thanks largely to one woman, teachers
of the year was. they chose selfie. now merriam-webster chose its word of the year. it is science. science? yeah, about that. the folks at merriam-webster said science had the biggest increase in number of lookups in the online dictionary. a 176% increase, to be precise. the dictionary editors say a wide variety of discussions center on science this year. and speaking of science, my fellow space nerds, nasa has some big plans for plants on the moon. the space organization is teaming up with google to send flower seedlings to space. in an attempt to see if vegetation can survive on the moon. all in an effort to answer the ultimate question, can humans live and work on the moon? scientists say if they can successfully grow a garden, that might mean that humans could one day have a habitat on the moon. >>> here we go, hour two. i'm brooke baldwin live here in new york. we begin with the 911 calls. they have been released from the newtown school shootings. they took the lives of 20 children and 6 adults just about one year ago. deborah feyerick has just listened to the tapes. if you can, descr
and that would have meant more support for girls in math and science because they were not doing as well as boys at one time and we managed to close that gap, that would have meant helping boys despite everything else, reading, writing, school engagement, classroom comportment, pretty good research, teachers have a bias against unruly students. understandable but these students can be 5 or 6 years old. i don't know if it is something we want to blame the boys for or punish them for, we want to make a classroom happy place for the manned room for their personalities and high spiritedness. we haven't done a good enough job with that. >> host: is there a shortage of male teachers and does this have an effect if there is? >> guest: there are few male teachers in elementary school. you have slightly more in high school but still this is a slight exaggeration but one critic of the current school system said schools are run by women for girls. an overstatement not my much. a lot feel that way. researchers interviewed boys, why did you leave school? why did you drop out? one little boy said i thought no
to be taken care of. this isn't science fiction anymore. now, undetectable firearms have always been around since the days of world war ii. it was clearly a present danger. that's why in 19 both parties got together to pass it and it's been extended since then. but it is no longer science fiction that somebody can just make a gun in their basement, basically obliterating the utility of all of our nation's firearms laws and use it to perpetrate great evil throughout this cannes. -- throughout it country. 3-d printers cost only about $2,000 today. most futurists are pretty certain that in maybe a decade or more, most americans will have access to this technology, just like the photocopier and the personal computer seemed out of reach at some point for most middle-class americans. maybe today the 3-d printer is but in a decade or more it might just be another household appliance that sits right next to your computer printer. second, we know how dangerous plastic guns are, because people have tested this premise. one investigative journalist in israel took a plastic gun into the israeli parliam
and science. of the 34 developed countries involvedded in the study. u.s. ranked 26th in math, 21st in science and 17th in reading. that's despite the united states spending more for student than almost all other countries. the u.s. spends about $115,000 per student. the slovak republic spends about $53,000 a student. >>> no news may be good news for b.a.r.t. commuters. it's been ten day since the board asked union leaders to resubmit a revised contract without a disputed family leave provision. still no talk of the unions going on strike for the third time this year. it appears more and more likely that the unions will head to court to settle this contract dispute. >>> all right, pam. time about 7:12. a big meeting scheduled today on treasure island. why many people are being told they may have to pack up and move out of their homes. >>> devastating. >> a deadly shark attack in hawaii. >>> good morning. we're looking at a commute that's moderately heavy. as we look at 280 at the 880 interchange. you will see it's slow. coming up i will show you what the san mateo bridge looks like. >>> still
, china, scored the highest in math, reading, and science. american teens did not make the top 20. so we were surprised today to learn that the chinese are going to try something revolutionary. they're cutting back on home work. we asked seth doane to find out why. >> reporter: who's happy about not having home work? the reaction from these second graders was not surprising. a resounding show of support. the proposed changes means students in grades one through three would not be assigned home work. those in grades four through six would have less than an hour of home work a day. liu xiaojing teaches kindergarten in beijing's elementary school. "not giving home work leads more space for kids to grow" she told us. "students can develop freely and do what they enjoy doing." >> we can read books. >> reporter: ten-year-old daisey told us she might dance or draw. while 12-year-old charlie had something else in mind. >> playing football or playing basketball with my classmates. >> reporter: china puts heavy emphasis on standardize tests which prizes memorization over creativity. under the new
the budgets are going. >> private industry science. >> you have a new one. >> you got it in. >> very good. >>> coming up next on "new day," newtown, connecticut, bracing for the release of 911 tapes from the deadly school shooting that happened almost one year ago. we'll have more on what you can expect. >>> and bill clinton's spreading out the tea leaves again. what did he say about his wife hillary and the chances that she'll run? the chances that she won't run? we'll try to decipher the code when we come back. ood things for the whole community: the environment, seniors, kids, and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3
practices. cork. connor's house. science was just stuart weekly little post to see if they can be sure to post it here for most of the separatists. you know amazing stage yesterday right after i read that until the day cameras record the journey this morning to find out what you think it's like to have to say. long live our own. we did a little more. the new generation beyond me. in seventeen fifty sixty or so in the sixties that these feelings out. on that name. to see people haven't seen him on hold. it keeps me on the nc twenty eight you might get sent the surveyed support. was it to the present institute presents. i think it's in the gym. it's you know me as i need so much information the victory and get some things in the studio. you can see people having the time so in command to be with women. secondly why not nominate for the sale. that or thailand accounts. and there would be a step family would be great. it's a blessing in your mind should be to get sleepy. he still has yet said it's a couple moments of our so called flight school. it's a debate when it comes as some people a
the rejections. >> i was happy to hear the consultants say that it's an art and not a science. i think it's totally illogical. >> the commission will announce its final decision coming up there he soon, december 20. a number of people have been following this all along said today that they were star and that this decision was anything other than mgm. brad bell, abc 7 news. foroming up, a warning anyone who spent time at one of the nation's largest military installations and their children after a warning from the cdc. >> heating up in the high-stakes battle to become the new home of the fbi. a retailers taking notice of trend, spending big bucks on toys even though they don't have children. >> sam ford will have some of the recollections avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive" sales event is back. which means it's never been easier to get a new 2014 jetta. it gets an impressive 34 highway mpg and comes with no charge scheduled maintenance. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. sign. then drive. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero fi
, who is this guy. >> reporter: this is leo. as a kid he was obsessed with science, os stron my, chemistry, physics. but then he fell in with the wrong crowd, became a father two years. two years ago, first lost his job and then his home. >> what did you think he wanted? >> i don't have anything, man. you got the wrong guy. no, you know, he just said, hey, this may sound strange. i put you an offer. i can either give you $100 and you spend it however you want to or i present you with this brand new laptop and teach you how to code. and instantly i just said, in my mind, door number two. >> reporter: he would write code for hours, for days, on the banks of the hudson or in a corner nook in patrick's office. at night patrick would go home and leo would go back outside. shelters just aren't his thing. which all seemed fine until winter blew in. >> reporter: how do you stay warm on those really bitter nights? >> go to the train station. bundle up with tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold. i keep telling him, i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> reporter: patrick just wanted
of jazz. it is partly what drives my interest of science and technology. >> also being honored tonight actress shirley mcklain. the actress joined the cast of the popular briti british show n abbey. >> and rounding out the list, martina labroyo. but who will perform tonight is top secret. >> any surprises? >> it wouldn't be a surprise if i did. >> cnn washington. >> we will have to wait patiently. but congrats to the honorees. and among them shirley mcklain. in an hour she will be weighing in. we have much more an it starts right now. hello again, these stories topping the news this hour. temperatures across the u.s. plunge. what it means for your travel plans. and he was the star of a movie that has generated over $2 billion around the globe. today his fans gather for an unforgettable tribute. killing for the fun of it? that is what investigators say a newly wed couple did. we'll tell you who confessed.
for courts to overturn convictions based on science that is later debunked so on november 18th the san antonio four reunited and meeting the granddaughter for the first time and ready to makeup for lost time. >> it was a death in the family and births. marriages and just so many things over the years that we have missed. >> reporter: the road aheld won't be easy, the women have been released but not exonerated and there is that to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together they will do all that and more. heidi docastra al jazeera san antonio. >> more than 2000 people who were wrongfully convicted have been exonerated in the past two decades and spent an average of ten years in prison and 30% of them have been exonerated by dna evidence. the president obama and first ladder were there and billy joel and santana and oprah singer, jazz musician herbie joncock and these are performers who influenced culture through the arts. and the flash mob military style, the u.s. airforce ban surprised visitors at the washington and space museum and it starte
inequality. science and of government. second both his bike in the musical freedom of belief of what to do carlton. i'm sentimental reasons the media the government says the commission. moody's expects credit union the new sale a week. but then the inclined plane. going to need to let the religion of the fingerprints of oil. this is where the title. it's quite painful. through seven cents. i'm thinking the best interests. he delivered through to the employer. or it can serve them. he's making money. many nobly extensive quote is some kind of pity. so here's to a small and i are members of an eagle then retold. many students going that's the true reality of the jungle. catherine. i read on to this child break a few weeks for me is perfectly content ay ay ay ay ay ay ay ay ay ay ay ay. ch. i am just can't afford leaders account to your location or the triple j showed up the anti eu protests and bulgaria greece are hungry to urge people to leave the eu would join the population customs union. obviously the mainstream media would be artfire scream that this is part of the abuse of democracy th
of the way the transition system operates in the science cost and i'm concerned that under order 1,000, ferc is defining the benefits so broadly into spreading the cost so wisely that the simple action has no meaning anymore. chairwoman lafleur, please explain the idea of the beneficiary pay and what that should mean and keep in mind i don't want my constituents. i know you can't address the merits of the individual complaints filings under the 1,000 but there is a leave of the point i would like to raise with you that i think stands on its own which i hope you will be able to respond. >> thank you congressman. the order 1,000 required to plan cooperatively across the region as the region encompassing pennsylvania already does. and take into account three kinds of benefits. reliability benefits, which can be hard to quantify that are very real, the needing public policy requirements to connect to resources that the states require them to connect which are normally identified by the states such as pennsylvania which is a renewable portfolio standard, and a third congestion benefits to reduce
work and some math and science, just about anyone can become one. this week is your chance to give it a shot, and don't let anyone tell you can't. jon: white house says they are making progress with healthcare.gov. they're just not there yet. jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. peter, thank you. jon: there is growing outcry over what many see as an unintended side-effect of obamacare. to try to contain costs many of the new insurance plans are severely limiting access to some of the nation's top hospitals including two world-renowned cancer centers. joining us for more on all of this, bob cusack, managing editor for "the hill." we'll get to the hospital access question in just a second, bob but what do you think, first of all, of the newly-redesigned obamacare website? >> i think the story is shifting a little bit from the website problems because it is still getting better but as peter mentioned there still are problems but now the story is shifting to cost. remember the administration obamacare would reduce costs. certainly there will be winners and losers here. if you can't
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> back of the book segment tonight. animals running wild. yesterday a black bear attacked a 4-year-old susan chalfant in a suburb of orlando, florida, if you can believe it. she was mauled by the bear while walking her two small dogs. >> is this a fire or medical emergency. >> medical. a woman, i think, has been mobbed by a bear. she is bleeding. she needs immediate help. >> okay. are you still with her right now, steve? >> yes, my wife is with her right now. we have her in the house. but she is pleading for quick, quick help. she is in severe pain. >> okay. and you said it was a bear, for sure? >> she thinks it was a bear. >> okay. how old is she? >> i can't tell. you know, she is so bloody i can't tell. >> now, ms. chalfant remains to be hospitalized with what are said to be traumatic injuries to her face and other parts of her body. joining us from kansas city, "time" magazine editor at large who wrote a story for the magazine about the growing problem with wild animals. so i understand it's bears an
a map. as it turns out the production was part of a commercial shoot supporting the museum of science fiction. a non-profit initiative that plans to build a full scale museum in washington. while the district has over 50 museums and historic sites, they say this would be the first in the world devoted exclusively to the sci-fi genre. supporters are hoping to raise enough money to hold up a temporary preview museum by next year. >>> up next, remember when the republican party promised to stop alienating groups that didn't vote for them? apparently the republicans don't. that's ahead. and this is "hardball," the place for politics. ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." after the republican party's second national defeat at the hands of barack obama last november, some of the grownups in the party decided to set out to find what went wrong. the autopsy concluded that in order to win national elections again, the republican party needed to overcome the public perception that it is intolerant, out of touch, and simply doesn't care. but have the republicans followed their own advice so far? "
retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. ...are the hands that do good things for the whole community: the environment, seniors, kids, and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. >>> hey, how was your wednesday morning? feels like a long time ago, right? take a quick look at how congressman duncan hunter of california kicked off his wednesday morning today. >> i think that is the way to do it, with a massive aerial bombardment. >> good morning, there will be a massive bombardment campaign. >> the next thing they think will come up with the campaign is a doozy, coming up. in the nation, sometimes bad things happen. but add brand new belongings from nationwide insurance and we won't just give you the partial value of items that are stolen or destroyed... .
. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> one of the biggest cities in america is shut down because of a massive win storm that's faegting the entire midwest. major highways across the dallas/ft. worth area have been closed until further notice. with temperature dipping into the 20s which right now is colder than in anchorage, alaska, the dallas marathon has been officially cancel for the first time in its 26-year history. ed, how much ice so far has fallen on that region? >> well, across the region depending on where you are. between one and four inches of ice or sleet has fallen. it was supposed to be the beginning of the festivity holiday weekend around here has turned into a silent night. it is a nightmare. a haunting description, ice, trees encased by freezing rain are buckling under the sheer weight of the ice. home left without power. crews are trying to salvage the lines still working and the roadways are a hazardous mess. >> go slowly. watching out for the person in fr
remember thinking in my head, huh, who is this guy? >> this is leo. as a kid, he was obsessed with science, astronomy, chemistry, physics, but became a father too soon. lost his job, then his home. >> at first, what did you think he wanted? >> i didn't think, you got the wrong guy. he said, hey, this may sound strange, i'm going to approach you with an offer. i'll give you $100 and you spend it however you want to or i'll present you with this new laptop and teach you how to code. instantly, i said in my mind, door number two. >> he would write code for hours, for days. on the banks of the hudson or in a corner nook in patrick's office. at night, patrick would go home and leo would go back outside. shelters just aren't his thing, which seem fine until winter blew in. how do you stay warm on those really bitter nights? >> a train station. loick tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold. he's like, i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> see, patrick just wanted to get him employed and housed, but leo had other ideas. what did you want to do with this information he was teaching you? >> make
a vehicle. i know this looks like science-fiction. it's not. this is years away. drops the package. come and get your package. we can do half hour delivery -- >> half hour delivery? >> the notion of drones making deliveries to your door step which even bezos admits is years away was quickly launched into the media stratosphere. >> an eye opener on "60 minutes." may zone is work on delivery drones that would drop-off goods from their warehouses no humans involved. >> on this cyber monday the world's largest retailer say it's testing a wild new way to deliver small packages to your home. >> we were talking about amaz amazon's plan to deliver to new heights. >> it was unbelievable. the commentary on the media. it's group think in the media. always see from reporters repeating and tweeting. this was the same story on every network in the same angle. no one was taking this opportunity to talk about this great technology or other companies that actually have similar technology. it was all amazon, the same story. it's 27-year-olds gathering the news and repeating it. >> there was some good news
for computer skype tists and a leap for explorers and researchers. >>. >> i know it's meant for science, but it looks like it will be great to watch tv on. >> michael eaves will run down the big game. >> hundreds gather to mark a 33rd anniversary of nelson mandela's death. more when we return. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. an act of terror then a rush to justice for pan am flight 103. >> the eyes of the world will be on us. >> an investigation under scrutiny. >> it looks nothing like him. somebody's telling lies. >> this was a miscarriage of justice. >> did they get the wrong man? >> there's something else going on. >> a shocking documentary event begins with: the pan am bomber on al jazeera america presents. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with a quick look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are hold across the globe to remember one of the greatest leaders of our time. increasing tensions in asia
lover of science and philosophy so that was an early influence because raising me in california there were all sorts of influences but i had lessons and i took latin and french and i think we had a fight with the school system because with latin and spanish and french they said you can't take three language and my mother managed to turn this california school into a little prep school on the east coast. so a very strong influence on me. .. strong influence postmark before we go to call, how did you end up at the american enterprise university? >> guest: once i was on tenure, i went on a ship that went around the world and it's about 30 professors in the wonderful program. i was friends with all of them. i liked all of the teachers but they were certainly didn't radical. it was marxist, and this was in 1988. the soviet union was intact and yugoslavia was celebrated as a model society. so long story short i came off the ship and wrote an essay called the professor at sea. especially since it was so colorful. teaching these young women that they were oppressed and again, i found it
years, american 15-year-olds have fallen further behind in math, science and reading. it's dubious for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here i
at a maximum right. you do your proper testing. and the type of things we're seeing isn't rocket science. web application development is a proven science. companies do it alt time. >> this does not need to be a silicon valley space project. this is bread and butter business application web site. i would agree with mr. kennedy in the five, $10 million range max. >> okay. so you could have built it for five or 10 million. extraordinarily, darrell issa yesterday said that he had testimony that apparently a large internet technology company offered the federal government, we will build your site for free. and the federal government passed on it. who was it? i was reading on-line, it was probably ibm because i think in 2010, the ceo was talking about yeah, we offered the federal government to build it for them, but they passed. think about that. we could have saved a billion dollars. it could have been done by ibm, the gold standard in that kind of technology and we passed. what? well, maybe there is no incentive in washington to save money or do it right. >> and david kennedy, who you heard from,
as a manageable medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. meanwhile, our partner agency, the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells aga
are down four spots in science coming in at 24. and they slipped another -- >> this is unbelievable. >> ten spots -- >> look at that. >> to 21st when it comes to reading. several chinese cities as well as japan and singapore saw their students improve significantly. >> willie geist, your mom has been involved in educational reform. we were talking about mike bloomberg who dedicated four years to it. the gates spent billions and billions of dollars and the only thing -- not the only thing but one of the main things they learned reducing class sides. they spent billions of dollars on that. that doesn't work. man, the past four years when it seems everybody's focus has turned to education reform in a big way, just been disastrous, not disastrous but terrible. our state of the union are getting worse and worse. >> this is a trajectory we've seen for more than a decade. it goes back. maybe you say we'll give the reforms of the last few years to settle in. reaction to this study was amazing. you have all these special interest groups saying it's not our fault. it's not the fact that we're teachin
attention to a new report from the nation's premiere scientific body, the national academy of sciences. we typically associate climate change with gradual, longer term problems. according to the academy, climate change could also pose a risk of rapid hard to predict environmental changes that have the potential to cause widespread damage in the near term. the report warns that the collapse of the polar sea ice could send sea levels soaring. the destruction of the coral reefs could cause mass extinction of sea life, the elimination of summer sea ice in the arctic could alter the world's weather patterns. these tipping points could happen suddenly. it's reckless to do nothing in face of these threats. if there is a 10% chance that these threats would happen, it's irresponsible for us to ignore it. dr. richard alley, one of the authors said, you can't see it coming. you can't prepare for it. congress is irresponsible if we don't take this issue seriously. to pass on our planet worthy of our children and grandchildren's future. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . the n
science fiction, it's not. >> wow. >> this is early, this is still years away. drops the package and there's the package. >> the idea is that the unmanned aircraft would deliver purchases to customers in less than 30 minutes of an online order. bezos says the drones may be ready in four to five years. they are working on commercial regulations for unmanned drone use. critics expressed concerns about the safety and whether americans can put past their feelings regarding the stigma associated with drone technology. so what does your gut tell you? should drone delivery take flight? before we go, one of our producers mark katz, decided to grow out his beard for no shave november to raise awareness for men's health. today mark trusted me to shave him. here's a look. >> you ready? >> yeah. >> okay. no man ever trusted me that much, mark, i wonder why. >> wow you went from kenny rogers to cutie. >> anyway, this is before and after. there he is, that's the before. that's an after. mark, i'm so proud of you, what a great cause and thanks for trusting me. other than shaving my legs, i've never done
the sport they began understanding -- >> rose: peter did? >> peter morgan as sort of the science of the overtake in formula one which is different than nascar. it's something you have to wait for. >> rose: how do you get around the car. >> right. and he tried to define their lives. he didn't just interview some people and throw the facts together, he was able to design a narrative that is a serious overtaking. i think it's another thing that really surprises audience is that, you know, you never quite see what's coming next. >> rose: what's amazing to me also is here is a guy who can calculate, lauda. he took a risk and he said he wanted to get out of a race because he thought the risk was too great. too damn high to continue so he pulls out. >> well, again, he was a -- he always thought, i think in the long term and a great overview and hunt was forever in the moment, whether he was on the track, whether he was in a club, whether he was home, wherever he was, very gifted man and, as i said, both entirely authentic. >> rose: so niki lauda realizes he's beginning to find some comf
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)